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Please, help!!
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Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/08/2018, 03:49:14

does anyone have specific information about this bead? I had a book where information was given but I can not find it anymore. My information was that it was a Japanese bead related to Netsuke, dating from the late 19th early 20th century. But I would like more specific information about it.
Thank you for these informations
Kika

DSC02165.jpg (224.9 KB)  DSC02168.jpg (196.7 KB)  
kika

Modified by kika at Sun, Apr 08, 2018, 03:53:13

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Measures
Re: Please, help!! -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/08/2018, 05:22:40

I precise, it's big: it measures 33mm in length and 27mm in diameter in the widest part.
Has anyone the book where I did see a picture? I think it's a Japanese or American book, it's small.
Thanks,
Kika

kika

Modified by kika at Sun, Apr 08, 2018, 15:19:25

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Re: Please, help!!
Re: Please, help!! -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: hans06 Post Reply
04/09/2018, 03:16:39

hi Kika, found the same fabricated beads in the Japanese book Tombodama.

Tobodama_2.jpeg126.6 KB  Tobodama_1.jpeg101.4 KB  


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the Japanese bead
Re: Re: Please, help!! -- hans06 Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/09/2018, 06:56:44

Hello Hans,
Yes! thank you, it's this book. I didn't find mine!! But do you know something about this bead. Or does anyone help me to know more about it?
thank you,
Kika

kika

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Re: the Japanese bead
Re: the Japanese bead -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: hans06 Post Reply
04/10/2018, 02:27:14

found this picture online some years ago. Can't find the URL anymore, but I stored the picture under the title of the digital booklet where it was taken from "Glass-Beads-in-the-World"

Glass-Beads-in-the-World_1b.jpg (76.6 KB)  


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Re: Re: the Japanese bead
Re: Re: the Japanese bead -- hans06 Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/10/2018, 11:52:12

Thank you very much Hans. I had a book where there was a similar picture and impossible to find it. I would really like to know more about this bead.
You comfort me in the certainty that it's Japanese, but exactly what period? Where was it manufactured?
That is a problem!!

kika

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Edo period, 19th century
Re: Re: Re: the Japanese bead -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: hans06 Post Reply
04/10/2018, 13:18:54

The only thing I know about them is the beads were made in the Edo period and they were made in Nagasaki, Osaka, Kyoto and Edo. Osaka produced the most and there was also an older tradition of bead making there. Unfortunately I have never seen Edo or Osaka beads in real live or find more info in a language I do understand.



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I find myself wondering…
Re: Edo period, 19th century -- hans06 Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: Frederick II Post Reply
04/10/2018, 19:37:08

Hans, How did you find they "were made in Nagasaki, Osaka, Kyoto and Edo?"



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From a netsuke…this is they way I have found them in use:
Re: Please, help!! -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: Frederick II Post Reply
04/10/2018, 18:11:56

These are Edo Era Japanese beads made in sets of two -one larger than the other- for usage as netsuke. One above the other, gourd like…separated with a ring and swivel bail… for suspension from Japanese gentlemen's obi…as a counterweight for a tobacco pouch or inro.



Modified by Frederick II at Tue, Apr 10, 2018, 18:17:00

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thank you Frederik
Re: From a netsuke…this is they way I have found them in use: -- Frederick II Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/11/2018, 05:12:45

Thank you Frederick: Yes I have two beads like this and I did read, now I remember, the same thing. Thank you so much!

kika

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some similar beads
Re: Please, help!! -- kika Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: birdi Post Reply
04/10/2018, 20:20:24

I know nothing about these three beads. I found them in a bag of buttons purchased at a thrift store. The center of each whorl is a slice of cane with a design. One cane slice on each bead appears to be a signature (initials) and a date, HB 2001.

These beads are probably modern lampwork, but now I see the original concept that inspired the maker. Thank you.

1_3BeadsCls400.jpg (172.5 KB)  1_3BeadsGrouo420.jpg (102.1 KB)  


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Re: some similar beads
Re: some similar beads -- birdi Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/11/2018, 05:14:37

Yes they are made with the same concept!

kika

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Re: Similar-Looking Beads
Re: some similar beads -- birdi Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: Beadman Post Reply
04/11/2018, 11:26:17

The Edo beads were made by the insertion of a tool that was then twisted or rotated to cause the glass around it to spiral—whereupon the tool was removed (leaving an indentation).

Sometimes a similar effect was created using a pincer, so that two parallel indentations were made—and the desired effect of either undulating lines or swirls depended upon how much rotation was applied to the pincers.

The more-recent beads were made similarly. However, the glasswoker has cleverly inserted a pictorial mosaic-glass cane (as for millefiori work). In this instance, the process is pursued quickly (before this cane becomes too hot to be functional). The cane is inserted, twisted, and broken-off. Since the cane is broken, we can see it's cross-section—providing a small decorative unit. So the effect is similar, with the added bonus of providing a central decoration where the previous method left a depression.

JDA.



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thank you so much JDA
Re: Re: Similar-Looking Beads -- Beadman Post Reply Edit Forum Where am I?
Posted by: kika Post Reply
04/11/2018, 12:22:52

kika

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