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Original Message:   GREAT READ! Answer from Jan
Hi Tofsla,

I have seen this in other bead types as well. I also have collected ancient glass beads for many years, and every now and then you will find a nearly perfect glass bead that still has the original sheen. I have spoken to archaeologists who say the same thing, so it is not just fakes mixed in with other older beads.

I also collect pre-Columbian beads and objects from the Western hemisphere, and you can often find ancient beads right out of a burial that are in unused condition.

I think a possible reason is that beads are made or perhaps acquired at the time of a death and used for ceremonial purposes, such as for burial with a family member or high ranked personage.

Another reason maybe that they were kept and not worn except for special occasions. I see many decorated spindle whorls that appear unused, even though weaving was commonplace in the culture. I would think that like your tuxedo, that is only worn from time to time, the most decorated or valuable objects are only worn from time and there fore keep their condition intact.

On the other hand, many Indo-Tibetan beads have been considered as amulets, and are often worn daily by their owners. This would of course create wear even on very hard stone. Some of the found dZi type beads may have been worn or held by multiple generations of owners throughout centuries even.

What do you think my friend,

Jan

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