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Original Message:   Tests and Testing
December 30, 2019

First, since 1907 phenolic plastics have, likewise, been materials that take a negative static electric charge. Consequently this became a useless test in the arena of amber, over 100 years ago (!).

You would have to describe what you consider to be a "smell test." I know what I think that means—but I call it a "rub test."

Because amber and copal are very similar, if it is significant to distinguish between one and the other—the primary difference is MELTING POINT.

The hot-point test is useful because copal melts much more easily than does amber. It also exudes turpine aromas—that are different for different materials (be they plastics, copals, or ambers). This is exactly why the hot-point test can be helpful and even necessary. (The next alternative would be to pay for a chemical analysis from a trained technician.)

JDA.

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