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Original Message:   Re: Venetian?
Dear DD,

Can you amplify what you indicate by "vintage Indonesian...."?

Javanese reproductions of old beads popular in Borneo are recent enough that to refer to them as "vintage," seems like a mistake. And, at best, to some minds it will imply that these Javanese beads have circulated 'for a long time'—and are or may be older than is the circumstance.

It is my opinion that most (or possibly all) of the Lukut beads (and others!), enjoyed by Borneoan people were made at Venice. And, consequently, I think they are more-recent than the common and much-repeated ideas about age/origin suggest.

If I recall accurately, the first time I saw a strand of new Javanese Lukut Sekala beads would have been about 2004—and I bought them (at Tucson). I do not recall seeing any such reproductions during my trip to Java in 2008, or else I would have bought them there too. However, by 2010, Nurwakit (in Jombang) was making reproduction Borneo beads, that were being offered for sale at the Borneo International Beads Conference. I bought a necklace that copies a specific family heirloom. (I'll try to dig up a photo.). I also bought a necklace of his beads at the Conference in 2015.

By the way, although it remains popular and still-often-repeated, the name "latticino" was demonstrated to be made-up (invented), and not a traditional Venetian name, decades ago. Many people think the name relates to "lattice work." But, in fact, the name means "tiny whites"—and refers to the internal filigrana within such canes. I suppose I am in the minority in attempting to encourage people to use the real Italian names for things.

Be well. Jamey

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